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33 Different Types of Power Tools and Their Valuable Uses

Here are 33 types of power tools every handyman and DIYer should know about.

This article is intended as an introduction to the most common types of power tools you may use or think about buying. This has been made possible thanks to a good amount of personal experience, tools testing, and many hours of research.

It’s not always easy to classify power tools. But we’ve attempted to categorize them into sections and subsections, trying to get them organized as best we could.

You can easily navigate through them from here if you want.

Here they are:

Electric Handheld Power Tools

Power Saws
#1 Circular Saw
#2 Track Saw
#3 Reciprocating Saw
#4 Jigsaw

Drills & Drivers
#5 Drill
#6 Hammer Drill
#7 Impact Driver
#8 Electric Screwdriver
#9 Impact Wrench

Grinders & Sanders
#10 Angle Grinder
#11 Belt Sander
#12 Orbital Sander / Random Orbital Sander

Other Power Tools
#13 Rotary Tool
#14 Router

Electric Stationary Power Tools

Power Saws
#15 Band Saw
#16 Miter Saw
#17 Table Saw
#18 Wet Tile Saw

Machine Tools
#19 Bench Grinder
#20 Drill Press
#21 Lathe
#22 Milling Machine
#23 CNC Router

Air Tools

#24 Air Compressor
#25 Nail Gun

Outdoor Power Equipment

#26 Chainsaw
#27 Pole Saw
#28 Log Splitter
#29 Hedge Trimmer
#30 String Trimmer
#31 Lawn Mower
#32 Leaf Blower
#33 Snow Blower

Keep reading to find out more about these power tools or click any one of them, above.

Electric Handheld Power Tools

Let’s start with portable and ergonomic tools that are mostly powered by electricity.

Power Saws

#1 Circular Saw

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air / Hydraulic fluid

Circular saws are so widespread, do they even need an introduction?

This power tool uses the rotary motion of a toothed or abrasive blade to cut different materials, such as wood, masonry, or metal. 

They have long been among the best for straight cuts, but there is more to them nowadays. Some models now offer the ability to adjust the depth of cut and/or the bevel angle of cut. This gives the user a large number of cutting possibilities.

Before buying, ask yourself which options you want for your saw, depending on your needs and budget.

Although the blade is generally surrounded by a frame for safety, be always careful when using a circular saw, as for any other power tool.

For more details on circular saws, see our articles on how to use a circular saw and how to make your own circular saw guide.

To learn about this year’s top-notch cordless circular saws and how to choose the right one, check out our article on the best cordless circular saws on the market.

#2 Track Saw

Powered by: Electricity

Track saws, also referred to as plunge saws, are a type of circular saw that slides on a guide rail, thus allowing for long and precise cuts.

Unlike circular saws, they plunge into the material to the depth set by the user prior to the cutting process. That means you may cut something off completely or choose to only make shallow grooves into it if you need to.

Some of them have a riving knife that follows the blade. This reduces kickback as well as blade pinching.

Track saws are light and easy to carry. They are also stable in most situations, thanks to the rubber strips that are fixed under the guide rail.

If you want to be able to make long and accurate cuts within seconds, a track saw may be a great tool to consider buying!

#3 Reciprocating Saw

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air / Hydraulic fluid

The blade of a reciprocating saw is moved in a push and pull motion, kind of imitating the movement of a handsaw. 

Reciprocating saws are also known as sawzalls, recip saws, or hognoses.

They are mostly used for construction, demolition, repairing, and remodeling jobs. Depending on the blade you use, you will cut metal, wood, composite, drywall, or other materials. You can also find a variety of blade designs intended for special purposes, such as demolition work or clean-cutting.

Most modern reciprocating saws come with variable speed control. They may differ widely in power, speed, and features though. From less powerful to high-power, high-speed models designed for heavy construction and demolition work, there is room for choice.

#4 Jigsaw

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air

A jigsaw can be considered a smaller version of the reciprocating saw as it uses the same push and pull motion. It is however more of a precision saw due to the stability it gets thanks to its soleplate.

Jigsaws are especially good for cutting curves and irregular shapes into wood, metal, or other materials. Note that most other power saws won’t be great for doing that. Besides, some even come with sole plates that have a beveling function, allowing you to cut angles up to 45 degrees.

If you are looking for a versatile power saw, it may well be the one you need. 

Drills & Drivers

#5 Drill

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air

Let’s talk about the most popular power tool of all, the drilling machine.

To use a power drill, you need to attach a cutting or driving tool to the drill’s chuck, which is coupled to a motor, to make it spin at high speed. The rapid rotary motion of the tool pressed against your target will then allow you to perform drills and drives quickly and effectively. 

If you want to be able to realize common drilling and driving tasks such as piercing a hole or tightening a screw in seconds, you definitely need a drill. 

There are drills or drivers out there with more specific purposes though. Check them out below to learn more about them.

#6 Hammer Drill

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air / Hydraulic fluid

A hammer drill, also known as a hammering drill, is a type of rotary drill with an impact mechanism that generates a hammering motion. The percussive mechanism creates rapid hammer thrusts that pulverize the material, allowing quicker drilling with less effort. 

Hammer drills are mainly used for drilling hard materials, such as concrete, masonry, or stone.

Wouldn’t it be great if they could be used for regular drilling and driving as well?

Well, they can! Most of them come with a lever or switch that locks off the special “hammer clutch”, turning the tool into a conventional drill to also perform tasks such as screwdriving, wood, or metalwork.

#7 Impact Driver

Powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)

An impact driver is a power tool designed to drive screws fast.

At first, it is not always easy to differentiate an impact driver from a conventional drill as they look almost the same. The difference actually lies in the internal mechanism of impact drivers, which produces quick bursts of high torque. These bursts or “impacts” are what makes them drive screws more efficiently than drills. On top of that, the motion of the mechanism keeps the driver bit fully engaged with the screw head. As a consequence, you’ll hardly ever see any driver bit slipping or spinning. 

If you’ve got a job coming that involves a lot of screws, you may want to consider investing in an impact driver as you will be saving a lot of time while completing your job easily.

For more details on the difference between impact drivers and drills, see our impact driver vs drill article.

#8 Electric Screwdriver

Powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)

We can compare electric screwdrivers to impact drivers as they both have the same purpose, driving screws. They are much smaller and lighter though. This allows you to carry them with ease and to reach and drive screws located in narrow spaces.

However, be aware that they have less power and torque than impact drivers, so don’t expect too much from them.

But if you intend to replace or match your regular screwdriver set with a lighter and more convenient power tool, you may want to go for an electric screwdriver. By the way, your wrist will thank you for that!

#9 Impact Wrench

Usually powered by: Compressed air / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Hydraulic fluid

Also known as air gun, air wrench, or impact gun, an impact wrench is basically a socket wrench power tool. 

The sudden high speed delivered to the shaft by means of its motor allows for high torque output being released with minimal exertion by the user.

Impact wrenches are widely used by mechanics, especially for loosening wheel or lug nuts from cars and trucks.

You may need an impact wrench to loosen stubborn nuts and bolts at times. You might also think about purchasing one if you need to turn nuts quite tight – yet without requiring any precise tightening torque – or repeatedly.

Although you can find hydraulic ones, air and electric impact wrenches are the most widespread, with electric cordless models becoming more and more popular these days.

Grinders & Sanders

#10 Angle Grinder

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air / Hydraulic fluid

An angle grinder or side/disc grinder consists of a motor driving a geared head at a right angle on which is mounted a disc. The task performed then depends on the kind of disc you mount on the angle grinder, ranging from diamond cut-off discs to polishing pads. 

An angle grinder can thus be used to grind as well as to cut and polish various materials. To give you an idea, this is the kind of tool you want to have to smooth off the edge of the piece of metal you’ve just been cutting off.

Always wear safety equipment when using an angle grinder as there are a few hazards coming with its use. Make sure your work is safely clamped or held firmly in a vise and never use your angle grinder without its guard or handle attached. 

If you want to know about this year’s top-notch angle grinders and learn how to choose the right one, check out our article on the best angle grinders on the market.

#11 Belt Sander

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air (mostly small, one-handed models)

A belt sander consists of a motor turning a pair of cylinders on which is mounted a continuous loop of sandpaper. The constant linear motion of the sandpaper “belt” thus created allows for various sanding tasks to be realized.

Because belt sanders are large and powerful, they excel at the rapid removal of wood. They are also great for smoothing rough surfaces, leveling, rounding, and shaping. But that’s not really the sander you want to use for finishing work. Although if you were to mount fine grit finishing sandpaper on it, you would get a pretty decent result.

#12 Orbital Sander / Random Orbital Sander

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air

An orbital sander (on the right) is made of a motor driving a sanding surface spinning in circles to remove material from a targeted surface. As it is one of the least aggressive sanders out there, it is classified as a finishing sander. It is used for fine sanding or where little material needs to be removed.

There is a very similar-looking sander out there but quite different at the same time and probably even better. It is the random orbital sander (on the left). 

This sander makes its sanding disc not only spin but vibrate in tiny loops as well. This prevents swirl marks and so allows the user to work faster.

Random orbital sanders fall somewhere between heavy-duty belt sanders and light-duty finish sanders. They are among the best sanders to have for versatility and almost match the finishing qualities of finishing sanders.

Other Power Tools

#13 Rotary Tool

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless) / Compressed air
Sometimes powered by: Hydraulic fluid

Rotary tools simply consist of a motor driving a tool attachment and making it spin at high speed. Because of the amazing number of tool attachments available, so many different tasks can be performed with a rotary tool. Such tasks may include grinding, sanding, carving, engraving, polishing, or machining materials such as metal, plastic, or wood.

Rotary tools may be divided into 2 categories. 

First, we’ve got the most famous rotary tools, the Dremel tools. These tools are usually small and very accurate electric power tools.

In the second category, we find all other rotary tools and die grinders. Die grinders are comparatively larger than Dremels and are a bit less accurate. They are usually powered by electricity or compressed air, but there are a few hydraulic ones too.

Dremels are high speed (up to 35000 RPM) – low torque tools, whereas die grinders can’t rotate nearly as fast as Dremels but they have a much higher torque. 

So, when it comes to buying a rotary tool, the first thing to consider is whether you prefer precision over power or vice versa.

The range of applications for rotary tools is so wide considering the amazing number of attachments available.

Often, when people start using such versatile power tools, they can’t do without them anymore!

#14 Router

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air

Routers are made of an electric or pneumatic motor driving a spindle on which is mounted a router bit going through and past a flat base. 

This setup makes them especially good for hollowing out (“routing”) an area in hard material, mostly wood or plastic. But because of the many different router bits existing, they are also great for a whole lot of other tasks involving trimming, cutting, or shaping.

Hence, with a router, you will be able to make or finish straight or rounded edges and contours, carve out rabbets, create patterns, and much more.

Routers are surely a must have for woodworkers, but they may well be amazing for versatility lovers too! 

Electric Stationary Power Tools

Next, let’s talk about non-handheld machines that are almost always powered by electricity.

Power Saws

#15 Band Saw

Usually powered by: Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Compressed air / Hydraulic fluid

A band saw consists of a sharp continuous toothed blade running over two or more wheels driven by a motor. They are mostly used for woodworking, metalworking, and lumbering. But, they may also be used to cut various other materials.

Much like a jigsaw, a band saw is appropriate to cut irregular or curved shapes. Because of the comfortable length of the blade, it is also possible to cut thicker material or several pieces at the same time. On top of that, you don’t get a lot of mess using a band saw. That’s because, unlike a jigsaw, the blade travels from top to bottom, pulling the dust below the table.

Band saws are usually large stationary power saws. But, you can also find smaller and lighter models that you can carry around and install in a corner wherever you’re working. Nowadays, there are even cordless handheld band saws out there designed for smaller cutting needs.

#16 Miter Saw

Powered by: Electricity (Corded or cordless)

A miter saw is a power saw designed to make cuts at different angles. It is made of a circular saw blade mounted on a swing arm.

Miter saws are primarily used to cut wood trim and molding or to make any miter cut into wood. But, they can also cut metal, masonry, or plastic, provided the appropriate blade is mounted on the saw.

There are four types of miter saws that are commonly used. Those are the standard miter saw, the sliding miter saw, the compound miter saw, and the sliding compound miter saw.

  • A standard miter saw is the most basic as it can only perform crosscuts and miter cuts. 
  • A sliding miter saw has a rail system that slides the blade from front to back. This type of saw allows us to cut through wider pieces.
  • With a compound miter saw, in addition to standard cuts, you will also be able to make bevel cuts as well as compound cuts (miter and bevel). 
  • Finally, the sliding compound miter saw is a compound miter saw with a sliding function.

Note that compound and sliding compound miter saws can be either single bevel compound or dual bevel compound, meaning they can tilt only to one side (left or right), or to both sides (left and right).

For more on miter saws, check out our guide on how to use a miter saw.

#17 Table Saw

Powered by: Electricity

A table saw consists of a circular saw blade mounted on an arbor that is driven by an electric motor, either directly, by belts, or by gears. The blade sticks out from the top of a table, which is used for driving the workpiece, usually wood.

The blade height can be adjusted. Moving it up or down allows the user to set the depth of cut he needs. It is said that the blade should extend higher than the board being cut by 1/4 in. This not only enables smooth cutting but also lessens the risk of kickback and limits the potential for injuries.

Table saws differ in size and portability. Benchtop table saws are the most used by homeowners and DIYers as they are lightweight and relatively cheap. They are however less efficient than jobsite or compact table saws, which are a bit heavier but more accurate. On the heaviest hand of the spectrum, there are cabinet table saws that come with real heavy designs but that are probably the most efficient.

In all cases, be very careful when you use a table saw. A frameless circular blade is dangerous!

To learn how to safely work with a table saw, read our guide on how to use a table saw.

#18 Wet Tile Saw

Powered by: Electricity

A wet tile saw is made of an electric motor driving a diamond-encrusted circular saw at high speed.

A continuous jet of water is sprayed over the blade to cool and lubricate it as well as to remove dust. Most of the time, it’s done in a closed water circuit as there is a built-in reservoir to the tile saw. Other models require us to attach a hose to it. This as well provides a continuous stream of water, but old water is not re-used and therefore wasted.

Wet tile saws come with a design either similar to that of a table saw or a miter saw, with the first being kind of a consumer-level and the latter a contractor-level type of saw. You guessed it, contractor-level wet tile saws are more expensive, as they not only allow us to make straight cuts but also miter as well as bevel cuts

A wet tile saw is really an excellent tool for cutting ceramic, porcelain, as well as stone tile.

Unlike a snap tile cutter, you’ll consistently get smooth and clean cuts with a wet tile saw.

Machine Tools

#19 Bench Grinder

Powered by: Electricity 

Bench grinders are machine tools made of an electric motor driving abrasive wheels. They are good for grinding various pieces of metal, mostly cutting tools, such as tool bits, drill bits, chisels, or gouges. 

Different grinding wheel bonds and grades are available for bench grinders. We can thus select the wheel that is appropriate to the type of tool or workpiece we want to grind. Grinding wheels are also interchangeable with wire brush wheels or buffing wheels to clean or polish workpieces. 

By the way, there are similar machine tools specifically made for buffing. Those are bench buffers. The main difference between the two is the absence of shields and tool rests on buffers. They are also designed with more space around the shaft, allowing more maneuvering of the object being buffed.

#20 Drill Press

Powered by: Electricity

Just like a handheld power drill, a drill press is designed to bear holes in various materials, mostly wood or metal. The main difference between them is obvious, their size! 

You may be asking yourself why in the world would you buy such a large power tool when you can also make holes with a regular drill. Well, if you only need to drill a few holes from time to time, a drill press isn’t really for you. But once you start needing more precision, power, and control over your drills, you may want to give the drill press a chance.

With a drill press, you don’t rely on arm strength and precision as is the case with a handheld drill. Drill presses come with more powerful motors and the movement of the drill bit is perfectly vertical. With your workpiece held firmly into a vise or clamp, all you have to do is make the rotating drill bit (held in the chuck) come down precisely where you want your hole to be. On top of that, a depth stop allows you to get control over your drilling depths.

Drill presses are either mounted on a stand or bolted to the floor or to a workbench. They can also be lightweight portable models with some even being designed with a magnetic base that allows for easy positioning on metal.

#21 Lathe

Powered by: Electricity

A lathe is a popular machine tool used for shaping various materials, especially wood and metal. A workpiece, held in the lathe chuck, rotates thanks to an electric motor. A tool is then slowly pressed on one side of the workpiece, thus shaping it with symmetry. This is usually done by hand for woodworking lathes and thanks to a tool rest guided by a rail for metalworking lathes. Depending on the tool that is used, it is possible to perform various operations such as cutting, sanding, drilling, turning, knurling, and more.

Lathes are widely used by pottery makers, watchmakers, and woodworkers. Many everyday life objects are done with them, such as table legs, cue sticks, or baseball bats.

Not everyone will want to give the lathe a go, for sure. You may need to be the creative type of person for that. But if you are, you’ll probably enjoy it and find a lot of satisfaction in shaping your own objects. 

#22 Milling Machine

Powered by: Electricity

Milling is the machining process that uses a rotary cutter to remove material (chiefly metals) from the surface of a workpiece. 

A milling machine, or mill, spins a milling cutting tool thanks to an electric motor. The process starts at a chosen depth (a hole you made before or on the side of the workpiece). The milling cutter is then slowly moved perpendicular to its axis of rotation, shaving off chips from the workpiece. This process allows for many different designs and a large number of shapes to be realized.

The most common milling machine is called a mill drill. It looks very much like a drill press but always comes with an X-Y table. Mill drills also have larger columns and more powerful motors to sustain the stress caused by milling operations.

If you like automation or if you want to create complex designs, you can also find small computer-controlled (CNC) milling machines at a reasonable price.

#23 CNC Router

Powered by: Electricity

A CNC router is a computer-controlled machine that allows us to create objects of many different designs and shapes. The design is created on a computer and then uploaded into the machine through a program, translating into cutting coordinates. 

The appropriate cutting tool is mounted on the Z-axis and rotates fast during the operating process. The machine then moves it along its 3 axes (at least), X, Y, and Z, following the program coordinates and cutting material where it is supposed to.

If you’ve read the above section, know that CNC mills work pretty much the same way as CNC routers do. But there are actually a few key differences between these two automated machines that you’d better know about.

While CNC mills are mostly used for metals, CNC routers are generally used to cut softer materials like wood, plastic, and certain softer metals. Routers are also designed to operate fast and they use rotational speed to make cuts, whereas mills work slower and use higher torque.

Aside from the technical stuff, it’s always a lot of fun to design an object on a computer and see it before our eyes a few minutes later. If you like computer-controlled machining, you may very well enjoy using CNC routers and mills! 

Air Tools

Next up are tools that are usually powered by compressed air or that produce it.

#24 Air Compressor

Usually powered by: Electricity
Sometimes powered by: Gasoline / Diesel

An air compressor is a pneumatic device, powered by an electric motor or a gas/diesel engine. It is used to store energy in the form of pressurized air.

There are a few types of air compressors, such as piston-type compressors, rotary screw compressors, or vane compressors. Whatever type it is, it works by forcing more and more air into a storage tank, thus increasing the pressure. When it reaches its engineered upper-pressure limit, the air compressor automatically shuts off. The compressed air held in the tank is then available for use.

Compressed air is used for a wide range of applications. Such applications include the supply of energy for air-powered tools like nail guns, paint sprayers, impact wrenches, and many more.

As the air goes out of the air compressor, the pressure in the tank decreases. Once it reaches its lower limit, the air compressor turns back on and re-pressurizes the tank.

Air compressors come in various sizes and shapes. From the biggest models to small and portable ones, the choice is yours!

#25 Nail Gun

Usually powered by: Compressed air / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Flammable gas (butane, propane)

A nail gun or nailer is a power tool that is used for driving nails instantly into wood or any other appropriate material. It is usually driven by compressed air but nowadays electric nailers are becoming more and more popular, especially cordless models.  

Nailers are widely used by builders and even more by carpenters for framing, roofing, flooring, and finishing. And it’s not hard to understand why. Think about the time and energy you save when using a nail gun instead of a hammer. Well, with a nail fully driven in one shot and 50 or 100 nails in the magazine, what do you think?

I agree, that sounds like quick nailing potential. But please never hurry and be always very careful when using a nail gun. As it throws nails somewhere around 400 ft/sec, it’s not hard to understand why they cause around 37,000 injuries every year. Pay close attention to where you aim your nailer at any time and keep that finger away from the trigger when you’re not ready to go!

Outdoor Power Equipment

Here’s our final section about power tools used for outdoor work, such as landscaping, and that are, for the most part, powered by gasoline engines or electricity.

#26 Chainsaw

Powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Diesel

Chainsaws are powered by a gas engine or an electric motor. The motor drives a rotating chain on which is attached a set of teeth along a guide bar. The fast-moving chain then needs to be progressively pressed against wood by the user in order to cut it.

A chainsaw is generally used to cut through large pieces of wood that can’t or aren’t easy to cut by hand or with smaller power saws. Examples of chainsaw use thus include tree felling, limbing, bucking, and cutting lumber.

Although most chainsaws are outdoor power equipment, there are also special chainsaws out there designed to cut concrete, masonry, or natural stone.

For more on chainsaws, read our guides on how to use a chainsaw and how to sharpen a chainsaw.

#27 Pole Saw

Usually powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Hydraulic fluid 

You guessed it, a pole saw is a saw on the end of a pole that is used to cut branches. In its most basic form, a pole saw is simply a long extendable pole with a curved hacksaw-like blade mounted on one end.

A power pole saw is essentially designed in the same way but you won’t spend nearly as much time cutting off a branch as you would have with a hand pole saw. The handsaw blade is replaced by a small chainsaw-like blade of which you can adjust the angle. It is usually powered by a gas engine or an electric motor.

Got branches to cut but only a ladder and a handsaw? Well, that’s a tough job and it takes time. What about a ladder and a chainsaw then? Sounds a bit dangerous, right?

Now you know that there are pole saws out there that are great for cutting branches with ease, from the ground. But don’t forget to pay attention to where the branch is falling. Watch your head!

#28 Log Splitter

Usually powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Diesel

A log splitter is a piece of equipment that is used to split logs of wood that have been previously cut into sections, usually with a chainsaw.

Most log splitters consist of a gas engine or an electric motor driving a hydraulic pump and a rod and piston assembly. The piston then moves a log of wood towards the other end of the log splitter, where a blade is mounted. The force generated through contact between the log and the blade is high, causing wood fibers to split. 

Alternatively, some of these machines may use an electrical rod and piston system, but it won’t be as powerful as a hydraulic one. 

In terms of design, log splitters can be either horizontal or vertical.

Of course, you can split wood using a good old splitting axe. But once again, as for every piece of machinery, a log splitter is a true time-saver.

#29 Hedge Trimmer

Powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)

As its name suggests, the purpose of a hedge trimmer is to trim hedges, but also bushes or small trees.

We are talking about motorized hedge trimmers here, not hedge shears or clippers, that are essentially large scissors.

Hedge trimmers are powered by a gas engine or an electric motor that usually drives two oscillating toothed blades. These blades are offset and one is stacked on top of the other, so they look like they’re sliding on each other. Each time a tooth passes by another, it acts as a small pair of scissors, thus cutting what happens to be between them, such as a hedge branch.

A hedge trimmer is really a must have tool for landscapers. Think about the time they save when trimming a hedge with a hedge trimmer instead of clippers or shears. Same thing for us at home!

#30 String Trimmer

Powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)

A string trimmer, also known as a weed eater or weed wacker, is a gas or electric-powered garden tool used for cutting grass, small weeds, or ground cover. They are mainly used near obstacles or on steep slopes.

A string trimmer is made of a motor, driving a spindle at the end of a long shaft, to which is attached a monofilament line, generally made of plastic or nylon. The rapid rotation of the spindle then makes the whirling line rigid, allowing us to cut grass and small woody plants quite well.

Many string trimmers are actually multifunctional, some parts being replaceable by accessories. Such accessories include metal or plastic blades, small chainsaws, hedge trimmers, and even cultivators.

#31 Lawn Mower

Usually powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Diesel

A lawn mower, also spelled lawnmower, is a tool that uses one or more blades, driven by a gas engine or an electric motor, in order to even the height of a grass surface. The motor usually stands in the middle of a base frame with four wheels and drives the blades located under it, ready to cut grass.

Not to mention manually powered models, there are four types of powered lawn mowers:

  • Push mowers: usually the smaller ones; require full human power to move over a surface.
  • “Walk-behind” mowers: they are self-propelled and require the user to only walk behind to guide it.
  • Riding mowers: larger ones; resemble tractors; the user rides the lawnmower and controls it.
  • Robotic mowers: operate on their own thanks to advanced technology.

There are also two main styles of blades that are used in lawnmowers:

  • Rotary mowers: lawnmowers with a single blade rotating around a vertical axis.
  • Cylinder or reel mowers: lawnmowers with a cutting bar and a rotating assembly (with or without blades) rotating around a horizontal axis.

Usually, the lawnmower you choose depends on the size of your lawn. If you’ve got a very small backyard, a manual mower might be enough. On the contrary, if you’ve got a huge lawn surface, maybe you should consider buying a riding mower. 

Anyway, with all the types and sizes of lawnmowers available, you’re more than likely to find the one that suits your needs!

#32 Leaf Blower

Powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)

A leaf blower is a gardening tool that is used to move leaves and other yard debris by blowing them. It is basically a quick “air broom”, as it allows us to pile rubble and debris up fast.

It is made of an air pump, powered by a gas engine or an electric motor, and a long nozzle, from which the propelled air goes out.

Most leaf blowers are either self-contained handheld units or backpack-mounted units with the air pump sitting on your back and the nozzle in your hand. 

Need more blowing power? Well, there are larger models out there also, usually resting on wheels. Some are even propelled by a motor and are called “walk-behind leaf blowers”.  

And last but not least, some leaf blowers even come with a vacuum function. That means they not only blow debris but they can also suck leaves and twigs into a bag, with or without shredding. Those are called leaf vacuums or blower vacs.

#33 Snow Blower

Usually powered by: Gasoline / Electricity (corded or cordless)
Sometimes powered by: Diesel

A snow blower is a machine that is used for removing snow where necessary, much faster than with a hand or rolling snow shovel.

Contrary to what one might think, snow blowers don’t actually blow snow using air. In fact, what they do is throw snow on the side using an auger or an impeller, usually driven by a gas engine or an electric motor. So technically, they are snow pumps rather than blowers.

Snow blowers come in a variety of sizes and snow removal capacities. From small snow blowers, capable of removing only a few inches of light snow to larger and more powerful models, there is room for choice. But make sure you pick the right one, neither too big nor too small! The snow blower’s size you choose should be correlated to the amount of snow that usually falls in your area.

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